Animals

Elephants dance when they hear woman playing violin

September 9th, 2020

Dancing is one of the greatest joys we have on this planet. It is something that seems to come so naturally to us — when we hear music or even just certain sounds — so it only makes sense that it would come naturally to animals as well. When there is a sound that we like and we just have to respond by moving our bodies — that is a feeling that we can all relate to!

Back in 2014, these two friendly elephants proved that they got some serious moves as well.

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Youtube Source: Youtube

A musician named Eleanor Bartsch took to Youtube to share what is maybe the cutest video the world has ever seen. The numbers speak to that, too, as it has gained over four million views!

In the viral video, we see Bartsch warming up for her performance of the Bach Concerto for Two Violins with the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra at the Circus World Museum in Baraboo, WI.

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Pexels Source: Pexels

While she was warming up, Bartsch decided to take her music outside, where two elephants were.

The elephants are named Kelly and Viola and at the time, they were 44 and 45-years-old.

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Pexels Source: Pexels

They had been living together for most of their lives and you can really tell, because the two elephants were clearly enjoying each other’s company, on this particular day at least.

As she began to play her instrument, Kelly and Viola stood next to each other and began to sway from side to side. Their long trunks swayed in unison and their ears even flapped in and out.

Kelly and Viola were having the time of their lives, all thanks to a little bit of friendship and music.

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Pexels Source: Pexels

“I found out that elephants really like Bach,” the violinist joked.

According to WWF-UK, elephants’ trunks have a whole lot of skills. They have 150,000 muscle units in their trunks alone, in fact.

“Elephants use their trunks to suck up water to drink — it can contain up to 8 litres of water. They also use their trunks as a snorkel when swimming,” the site says. And as we see here, they also use their trunks to showcase their fabulous dancing skills!

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Pexels Source: Pexels

WWF-UK also says that elephants communicate through vibrations, which would mean that it makes sense that they were responding to the violin playing.

“Elephants communicate in a variety of ways – including sounds like trumpet calls (some sounds are too low for people to hear), body language, touch and scent. They can also communicate through seismic signals – sounds that create vibrations in the ground – which they may detect through their bones,” WWF-UK says.

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Pexels Source: Pexels

They also communicate via Bach, we assume!

It was obvious that the elephants were enjoying the music so much. They stayed for the entire warmup and bobbed their heads the whole way through. At one point, Bartsch looked back at the camera to show us that she was dying of laughter.

It really is so cute, we can’t help but smile!

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Youtube Source: Youtube

Check out the adorable moment below.

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

Source: Youtube

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